art, design, travel, food, and the really good animated gifs

Hey all, I'm Thane. I illustrate and write Oobites.com.

I like food, science, travel, permaculture, and using technology to rip imagination into the physical plane.

I'm currently traveling in Guatemala.

Here's my portfolio at Behance.
You can buy my prints at Society6.
I got the Twitter too.

I do more Tumblrs:
Oobites' Tumblr
Grown Bamboo
Fuck Yeah Portraiture
Get Japanese


Photo

Aug 21, 2014
@ 4:11 pm
Permalink

That’s all the information I have about Proyecto Gaia. The sixth annual Convergence there was amazing too. 
Tomorrow I’m visiting Atitlán Organics outside of Tzunaná on Lake Atitlán here in Guatemala.
To those followers that I picked up while covering these permaculture projects, what kind of information are you most interested in?

That’s all the information I have about Proyecto Gaia. The sixth annual Convergence there was amazing too.

Tomorrow I’m visiting Atitlán Organics outside of Tzunaná on Lake Atitlán here in Guatemala.

To those followers that I picked up while covering these permaculture projects, what kind of information are you most interested in?


Photo

Aug 21, 2014
@ 11:58 am
Permalink

In the office: Idea Connection in San Pedro on Lake Atitlán in Guatemala.

In the office: Idea Connection in San Pedro on Lake Atitlán in Guatemala.


Photoset

Aug 21, 2014
@ 11:40 am
Permalink
4 notes

oobites:

Fried King Oyster Slices [with Borage Blossoms]:

This little appetizer had its illustration planned for a couple years now. Look at the publishing dates (and accompanying articles, linked):

King Oyster Mushroom - November 12, 2012

Borage Blossoms, Two - November 27, 2012

King Oyster Mishroom Slices - November 26, 2012

Fried King Oyster Slices - July 10, 2014

The delay on the final dish makes sense though. I had just started traveling. Drawing food with actual location information had a greater appeal than dishes I just encountered on the Internet.

It’s weird too, because I just ate a borage blossom for the first time two weeks ago here in Colombia of all places.

The king oyster mushroom pictured first is 1 of 30 mushroom illustrations on the Mushroom Collection print I made.


Photo

Aug 21, 2014
@ 11:31 am
Permalink
524 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics, you’re killing it lately.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Sloshing is a problem with which anyone who has carried an overly full cup is familiar. Because of their freedom to flow and conform to any shape, fluids can shift their shape and center of mass drastically when transported. The issue can be especially pronounced in a partially-filled tank. The sloshing of water in a tank on a pick-up truck, for example, can be enough to rock the entire vehicle. One way to deal with sloshing is actively-controlled vibration damping - in other words, making small movements in response to the sloshing to keep the amplitude small. This is exactly the kind of compensation we do when carrying a mug of coffee without spilling. (Image credit: Bosch Rexroth; source)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics, you’re killing it lately.


Video

Aug 21, 2014
@ 10:00 am
Permalink
269 notes

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Hydrophobic surfaces are great for creating some wild behaviors with water droplets, but they make neat effects with other liquids, too. The viscous honey in the first segment of this Chemical Bouillon video is a great example. Because the honey doesn’t adhere to the hydrophobic surface, the viscoelastic fluid does not maintain the form it had when drizzled on the surface. Instead, the honey contracts, with surface tension driving Plateau-Rayleigh-like instabilities that break the contracting ligaments apart to form nearly spherical droplets of honey on the surface.  (Video credit: Chemical Bouillon


Photoset

Aug 20, 2014
@ 10:32 pm
Permalink
1 note

From my friend Clare [pictured top] when she was just in Leticia:

"80km up river from Leticia is the Pueblo Puerto Nino. The community have "greened" their town with eco initiatives from daily cleaning the streets, having a no motor vehicle policy and powering all their electricity needs with an efficient generator. A great model of people power to improve their community in an economically poor region of Colombia. Now their success attracts eco-tourism not just for viewing Amazonas but as an example of sustainable living."


Photo

Aug 20, 2014
@ 12:03 am
Permalink
75 notes

bonitavista:

France
photo via ashlynn

Damn!

bonitavista:

France

photo via ashlynn

Damn!

(via ziggygnyiri)


Video

Aug 18, 2014
@ 8:57 pm
Permalink
93 notes

verticaltheory:

These folks feed their family with a garden in their swimming pool — and you can, too!

Read more here.


Photo

Aug 18, 2014
@ 8:20 pm
Permalink

≤3

≤3


Photo

Aug 18, 2014
@ 10:40 am
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370 notes

rhamphotheca:

The Brazilian Jabuticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) well and truly takes advantage of all the surface area on its trunk by growing its sweet, grape-like fruits all over.
* This syndrome of growing fruit on the trunk is called cauliflory, and is believed to have evolved to make fruit more accessible to gound based frugivorous animals. The fruits are a popular food for humans in South America, and have a wide variety of preparations and uses. (- Paxon)
Images: Bruno.karklis and Anderson S Silva (bit.ly/1sXHwip)
(via: ScienceAlert!)

rhamphotheca:

The Brazilian Jabuticaba tree (Plinia cauliflora) well and truly takes advantage of all the surface area on its trunk by growing its sweet, grape-like fruits all over.

* This syndrome of growing fruit on the trunk is called cauliflory, and is believed to have evolved to make fruit more accessible to gound based frugivorous animals. The fruits are a popular food for humans in South America, and have a wide variety of preparations and uses. (- Paxon)

Images: Bruno.karklis and Anderson S Silva (bit.ly/1sXHwip)

(via: ScienceAlert!)

(via ziggygnyiri)