art, design, travel, food, and the really good animated gifs

Hey all, I'm Thane. I illustrate and write Oobites.com.
I like food, science, travel, and using technology to rip imagination into the physical plane.
Here's my portfolio at Behance.
You can buy my prints at Society6.


Photoset

Apr 24, 2014
@ 9:52 am
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4 notes

efimeras:

Festival de arquitectura viva en Montpellier 2012

 

The French city of Montpellier hosted the seventh edition of FAV, where 11 teams from around the world competed with each other installations exploring the possibilities of human interaction through the use of materials, features and spaces to create and lead surprise. The projects were located in the yards of various landmarks of the city.

 

 

La ciudad francesa de Montpellier fue la sede de la séptima edición del FAV, donde 11 equipos de diferentes partes del mundo compitieron entre ellos con instalaciones que exploraban las posibilidades de la interacción humana a través del uso de materiales, funciones y espacios para crear y provocar la sorpresa. Los proyectos estaban ubicados en los patios de distintos edificios emblemáticos de la ciudad.

Título de Postgrado en Instalaciones Efímeras

Mas información en: www.instalacionesefimeras.com


Video

Apr 23, 2014
@ 7:59 pm
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Here’s a timelapse video of me painting one of Imani Dabney’s entomophagy contributions to the Austin Future Food Salon put on by Alimentary Initiatives of Toronto and Little Herds of Austin.

More info on the dish/event here: http://oobites.com/2014/04/bug-soup/


Photo

Apr 23, 2014
@ 10:18 am
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3 notes

starvingartistbook:

Bannock Restaurant Sandwich
This recipe is a concoction of chef Anthony Walsh based on his favorite ways to cook with maple syrup. This overlooked ingredient gives the traditional grilled cheese a unique boost, balancing savory with sweet. 
Featured in Toronto Life magazine and photographed by the amazing Emma McIntyre! Check out her wonderful work and if you’re ever in Toronto, be sure to swing by Bannock Restaurant. 
Serves: 2Time: 15 minutesIngredients: 1 onion, 1 tbsp butter, 1/2 cup maple syrup, salt, pepper, fresh bread, a few slices of old cheddar, 1 egg
Dice the onion and slice the bread. 
In a medium saucepan, sweat the onion in the butter and maple syrup until it turns thick like jam. 
Season with salt and pepper. 
In a different saucepan, coat both sides of the bread slices with butter and brown the outer sides like you would a grilled cheese. 
Spread the onion and maple syrup in between the bread and add the slice of cheddar cheese. 
Fry an egg and place on top the sandwich. Enjoy!

It was suggested I visit Bannock, but the last time I visited Toronto I missed it sadly

starvingartistbook:

Bannock Restaurant Sandwich

This recipe is a concoction of chef Anthony Walsh based on his favorite ways to cook with maple syrup. This overlooked ingredient gives the traditional grilled cheese a unique boost, balancing savory with sweet. 

Featured in Toronto Life magazine and photographed by the amazing Emma McIntyre! Check out her wonderful work and if you’re ever in Toronto, be sure to swing by Bannock Restaurant

Serves: 2
Time: 15 minutes
Ingredients: 1 onion, 1 tbsp butter, 1/2 cup maple syrup, salt, pepper, fresh bread, a few slices of old cheddar, 1 egg

  1. Dice the onion and slice the bread.
  2. In a medium saucepan, sweat the onion in the butter and maple syrup until it turns thick like jam. 
  3. Season with salt and pepper. 
  4. In a different saucepan, coat both sides of the bread slices with butter and brown the outer sides like you would a grilled cheese. 
  5. Spread the onion and maple syrup in between the bread and add the slice of cheddar cheese. 
  6. Fry an egg and place on top the sandwich. Enjoy!

It was suggested I visit Bannock, but the last time I visited Toronto I missed it sadly


Photo

Apr 21, 2014
@ 10:01 am
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46 notes

ignitingviriditas:

This is an extremely well-designed root vegetable washer that was made by the farmers at the Abode. A hose is hooked up to the pipe at the top, and sprays water over the roots while they are being tumbled about by bicycle power.

ignitingviriditas:

This is an extremely well-designed root vegetable washer that was made by the farmers at the Abode. A hose is hooked up to the pipe at the top, and sprays water over the roots while they are being tumbled about by bicycle power.

(via ziggygnyiri)


Photoset

Apr 20, 2014
@ 10:21 pm
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92 notes

mica-low:

Sorry about the radio silence folks, I’ve been crazy busy and haven’t had a spare moment to update my web presence! Have some little spot illustrations of mushrooms to make up for it. All edible and all found in north america- it’s an informal guess-the-species game, since I uploaded the version without captions.

hey, these are great—nice job

(via ediblefungi)


Photo

Apr 20, 2014
@ 10:11 pm
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95,244 notes

nosdrinker:

when is this going to become its own sport

man!

nosdrinker:

when is this going to become its own sport

man!

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via strawberrymurder)


Photoset

Apr 17, 2014
@ 10:01 am
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2,923 notes

basava:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal

The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.

Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.

Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.

Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.

Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.

(Source: odditiesoflife, via wherethecloudsgather)


Photo

Apr 15, 2014
@ 10:01 am
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13,380 notes

hellboundwitch:

crankyangela:

REDUCE THE NEED FOR PLASTIC BAGS WITH A TRADITIONAL JAPANESE ECO BAG
Furoshiki is a traditional Japanese wrapping cloth which is used to carry many different items and can be a great way to help the environment by using as a re-usable eco-shopping cloth.

I wrap my tarot decks this way sometimes..

hellboundwitch:

crankyangela:

REDUCE THE NEED FOR PLASTIC BAGS WITH A TRADITIONAL JAPANESE ECO BAG

Furoshiki is a traditional Japanese wrapping cloth which is used to carry many different items and can be a great way to help the environment by using as a re-usable eco-shopping cloth.

I wrap my tarot decks this way sometimes..

(via inlovewithjapan)


Photoset

Apr 10, 2014
@ 4:54 pm
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12,290 notes

(Source: feathery-soul, via wherethecloudsgather)


Photoset

Apr 10, 2014
@ 10:55 am
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9 notes

efimeras:

Brittlebush / Imon de Aguero

   Brittlebush is an experimental shelter designed to withstand the winter desert for residents of Taliesin (Frank Lloyd Wright Architecture School). A home designed as open-air living space that incorporates a textile cover where the structure is designed to be adapted to space of the house. Brittlebush has been almost built completely with recycled material found on the site.

   Brittlebush es un refugio experimental diseñado para resistir el invierno del desierto para los residentes de Taliesin (la escuela de arquitectura de Frank Lloyd Wright). Una vivienda pensada para ser vivida un espacio exterior que incorpora una cubierta textil donde la estructura esta pensada para adaptarse al espacio de la vivienda. Brittlebush ha sido casi completamente de material reciclado que se ha encontrado en el lugar.

Título de Postgrado en Instalaciones Efímeras

Mas información en: www.instalacionesefimeras.com

I’ve heard of this school before.  Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the curriculum involves you building your own house in the dessert for you to live in for the first few years.